Thank you for contacting me with your thoughts on marijuana

I received the following letter from Sen. Mitch McConnell on the 10th of this month.  Thought I would share it. 

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Dear Ms. Krider;

Thank you for contacting me with your thoughts on marijuana.  Your views help me represent Kentucky and the nation in the United States Senate, and I appreciate the opportunity to respond to your concerns. 

Kentuckians continue to combat the negative consequences associated with the cultivation and distribution of marijuana in communities across the state.  According to the Drug Enforcement Agency, in 2018, approximately 418,076 plants were eradicated in the Commonwealth, over $471,000 worth of assets were seized, and more than 73 weapons were taken off the streets as a result of the marijuana eradication operations.  Traffickers have been known to trespass on both private and public lands, often resulting in damage to private property and many of the Commonwealth’s most cherished natural habitats. 

There is no doubt that drug abuse persists as a serious problem in all 120 counties of the Commonwealth, and the effects of such abuse have proved devastating for our local communities.  That is one reason why I welcomed Jim Carroll, Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, to visit Kentucky in March, 2019.  Known as the country’s “drug czar,” Director Carroll focused his attention on understanding Kentucky’s efforts to treat addiction and combat drug abuse and trafficking.

In your correspondence, you mentioned the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act of 2019 (S. 2227).  Introduced by Senator Kamala Harris on July 23, 2019, the MORE Act would remove marijuana from the schedule of controlled substances, create a grant program for areas impacted by marijuana convictions, and provide for expungement for certain cannabis offenses.  Because of the harm that substances like marijuana and other illegal drugs pose to our society, I oppose their legalization.  That said, I will keep your thoughts in mind as the 116th Congress proceeds. 

Thank you for contacting me about this important matter.  If you would like to receive periodic updates about issues such as this, please sign up for my eNewsletter at http://mcconnell.senate.gov/ and become a fan of my page on Facebook, by visiting http://www.facebook.com/mitchmcconnell or follow my office on Twitter @McConnellPress.

Sincerely,

MITCH McCONNELL
UNITED STATES SENATOR

Agencies clarify requirements for providing financial services to hemp-related businesses

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From Board of Governors Federal Reserve System

Agencies clarify requirements for providing financial services to hemp-related businesses

December 3, 2019 

WASHINGTON-Four federal agencies in conjunction with the state bank regulators today issued a statement clarifying the legal status of hemp growth and production and the relevant requirements under the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) for banks providing services to hemp-related businesses.

The statement emphasizes that banks are no longer required to file suspicious activity reports (SAR) for customers solely because they are engaged in the growth or cultivation of hemp in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. For hemp-related customers, banks are expected to follow standard SAR procedures, and file a SAR if indicia of suspicious activity warrants.

This statement provides banks with background information on the legal status of hemp, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) interim final rule on the production of hemp, and the BSA considerations when providing banking services to hemp-related businesses.

This statement also indicates that the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) will issue additional guidance after further reviewing and evaluating the USDA interim final rule.

The statement was issued by the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, FinCEN, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Conference of State Bank Supervisors. Banks can contact the USDA, state departments of agriculture, and tribal governments with further questions regarding the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (2018 Farm Bill) and its implementing regulations.

Joint Guidance on Providing Financial Services to Customers Engaged in Hemp-Related Businesses (PDF)

For Federal Reserve Board media inquiries please contact Darren Gersh at 202-452-2955.

Source Link

(KY) Hemp, broadband concerns brought before state panel

For Immediate Release

November 18, 2019

Hemp, broadband concerns brought before state panel

FRANKFORT—Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mark Haney said his organization’s advice for Kentucky’s growing number of hemp producers is “be careful.”

Haney told the Interim Joint Committee on Agriculture today that farmers are encouraged to enter the growing hemp industry, but with minimal risk. Kentucky is still in its first five years of modern hemp production which began in 2014 under the state’s Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program.

The research pilot program is ending this year, with the state’s Hemp Licensing Program entering a new stage of commercial production in 2020.

“We tell all the producers, and have been saying all along, be careful. Go slow. Don’t risk any more than you can afford to put at risk,” said Haney. The caution comes as many farmers, he said, look to hemp as a replacement for once-reliable sources of income—like tobacco—amid today’s agriculture market disruptions and downturns.

Making hemp as profitable as tobacco once was to Kentucky farmers, if possible, will take time, said Haney.

“It would be wonderful if we could do that,” he said. “So we’re telling folks, ‘help us build the industry and don’t just try to swing for a home run.’”

Haney said the Farm Bureau has formed a hemp advisory committee to work on issues that could help farmers build the industry moving forward. That work, he said, could come in handy in any future legislative discussions concerning the farmer’s role in the hemp industry. Haney said he hopes hemp processors will take a similar approach regarding their role in the industry.

“Most of the questions about hemp that I’ve heard were not about production of hemp. It was about the processing of hemp and how we transport it, how we get paid for it, (about) the systems from the farm gate through the rest of the pipeline,” said Haney.

Rep. Joe Graviss, D-Versailles, asked Haney if the Farm Bureau’s hemp advisory committee could look into whether Kentucky farmers are being fairly compensated for their crop. He also encouraged a standard means to test hemp products, saying he would like the organization to look into “standardization in testing” of hemp products on store shelves to make sure “what is on the shelf at a gas station or a pharmacy is actually going to contain the same stuff.”

Concerns about cash flow to hemp producers also voiced by Graviss were shared earlier in the meeting with Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy Executive Director Warren Beeler, who said farmers have had high hopes for hemp amid uncertainty in other agricultural markets. Now farmers are finding that hemp production brings its own uncertainty, he told lawmakers.

“We don’t know exactly where we’re going to end up,” said Beeler. “But hemp has a chance to help us. It has a chance to be maybe that tobacco that we thought we’d never have a replacement for.”

One of the most critical issues facing many Kentucky farmers, said Haney, is the need for high-speed broadband. While most Kentuckians have internet access, Haney said rural areas remain that don’t have the connection speed necessary to use high-tech apps and programs now commonplace in modern agriculture.

“If you can’t operate the device that you’re working with because the speed is so low that you can’t even download the programming … it’s pretty sad. And it’s important to our members more now than it has ever been before,” said Haney, adding that his organization will likely approach the Kentucky General Assembly for help on the matter in the future.

Sen. Stephen West, R-Paris, an attorney and cattle farmer, said internet connectivity is important to him and his constituents, including a number of rural Kentuckians with limited internet access. West said that while full implementation the KentuckyWired project—which is intended to provide gigabit-speed access statewide—is expected within the next year or so, he wonders what support there is from the private sector for improved internet speed.

“They have to address these issues to get more service out to our farmers and rural areas,” West said.

Haney said the Farm Bureau is communicating with the private sector and is “hoping to put together some stakeholders that will continue to work on this in the near future.”

END



https://kentuckywired.ky.gov/Pages/index.aspx

Kentucky Launches Selling Farmers Tax Credit Program to Sustain Agricultural Industry

Applications for new incentive program accepted beginning Dec. 16

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 21, 2019) – Kentucky today launched a new program offering farmers incentives for selling their property to beginning farmers, an effort to further sustain one of the state’s most important industries.

Gov. Matt Bevin and partner organizations announced the Kentucky Selling Farmer Tax Credit (KSFTC) program, which will begin accepting applications Monday, Dec. 16.

“Farmers are a vital part of Kentucky’s economy, and this new program will help ensure our state benefits from its bountiful supply of agricultural land to the fullest extent possible,” Gov. Bevin said. “We are thankful for all who partnered in creating the KSFTC program, and we encourage selling farmers to take advantage of this exciting new opportunity.”

Eligible selling farmers could receive tax credits up to 5% of the purchase price of qualifying assets, with a $25,000 cap per calendar year and a $100,000 lifetime cap.

“The Kentucky Selling Farmer Tax Credit program is an innovative way to incentivize those farmers who are interested in selling their farmland to sell to new or beginning farmers,” Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said. “The average age of a farmer in Kentucky is about the age of retirement. We need to continue incentivizing agriculture as a career path so that Kentucky can maintain its reputation as a top-notch agricultural state.”

Both the selling and acquiring parties must meet the following criteria for beginning and selling farmers:

  • A beginning farmer cannot have previously owned any agricultural land for a period exceeding 10 years. In addition, beginning farmers must commit to managing and operating a for-profit farming business a minimum of five years after purchasing eligible agricultural land.
  • Selling farmers cannot have more than 50 full-time employees and must be the legal owner of agricultural land and assets sold to a beginning farmer. Sales involving immediate family members do not qualify for tax credit consideration.

Before completing a sale of agricultural assets, applicants should review the Kentucky Selling Farmer Tax Credit Guidelines for more detailed program information and eligibility requirements. After completing a sale, both the beginning farmer and selling farmer must submit applications to determine tax credit eligibility.

A number of partners were instrumental in KSFTC’s development. This collaborative effort included essential contributions from the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy, Kentucky Department of Agriculture, state legislators, Kentucky Farm Bureau, Farm Credit Mid-America and Kentucky Agricultural Development Board.

Mark Haney, Kentucky Farm Bureau president, said the program offers promise for beginning farmers needing access to agricultural land.

“Preserving our farmland is so critically important to the viability of Kentucky agriculture,” Haney said. “Access to land is one of the biggest challenges facing our young farmers.  We are hopeful the Kentucky Selling Farmer Tax Credit program will assist us in keeping Kentucky agriculture the strong economic engine it is for generations to come.”

Sen. David Givens, of Greensburg, said KSFTC will help support rural Kentucky.

“I was proud to aid in this effort to keep Kentucky farmland active in agricultural production,” Sen. Givens said. “By assisting young farmers in acquiring land through tax breaks for the selling family, we continue to strengthen our rural communities.”

Rep. Bart Rowland, of Tompkinsville, said KSFTC will help give beginning farmers the jumpstart they need.

“This program is without a doubt a win-win for our commonwealth,” Rep. Rowland said. “It keeps farmland in production and allows a new generation of farmers to get their foot in the door. Farming is not only a way of life, but a way to improve the quality of life for our communities.”

While this program provides tax credits to selling farmers, other state agricultural programs, such as the Kentucky Agricultural Finance Corporation’s Beginning Farmer Loan Program, are available to assist beginning farmers.

Visit www.thinkkentucky.com/Entrepreneurship/KSFTC.aspx for additional information or to fill out an application.

###


Governor of Kentucky

Questions? Contact us

DEA Data Show Kentucky Has Highest Rate of Illicit Marijuana Plants in US

Monday, Nov. 11, 2019 | Author: ProCon.org

Kentucky, where both recreational and medical marijuana are illegal, grows more illicit marijuana plants per 100,000 people than any other state, according to DEA data analyzed by American Addiction Centers. In 2018, the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) eradicated 418,076 cannabis plants in Kentucky, about 9,356 plants per 100,000 people.
California, which legalized medical marijuana in 1996 and recreational marijuana in 2016, came in second place with 4,572 illegal cannabis plants per 100,000 people. The DEA confiscated over 1.8 million marijuana plants in the state last year.
Massachusetts and Wyoming tied for last place with zero cultivated plants seized by the DEA in 2018. Wyoming has not legalized marijuana, but Massachusetts legalized medical marijuana in 2012 and adult-use (also called recreational) cannabis in 2016.
Across the United States, the DEA seized 2.82 million cannabis plants in 2018, down from 3.38 million plants in 2017.
Kentucky also earned first place in the number of destroyed illegal grow sites in the country. 15 grow sites per 100,000 people were destroyed in Kentucky, more than double the next-highest state, West Virginia (7.4 per 100,000 people). West Virginia legalized medical marijuana in 2017 but has not legalized recreational use.
Delaware, DC, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming all had zero grow sites destroyed per 100,000 people. Except Wyoming, each of those states and DC have legalized medical marijuana, and 3 states and DC have legalized recreational use: Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont.
Despite not having any plants seized, Wyoming bulk-processed the most marijuana at 1,095 pounds per 100,000 people, 46.8% more than the next highest state, Arizona, which had 746 pounds per 100,000 people. Arizona legalized medical marijuana in 2010. American Addiction Centers theorized that the marijuana being bulk-processed in Wyoming might come from nearby states that have legalized marijuana, such as Colorado.
Delaware, DC, Illinois, Maine, Minnesota, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Vermont bulk-process the least amount of marijuana (0 pounds per 100,000 people). Among those states, only South Dakota and Tennessee have not legalized marijuana for medical use. Three of those states and DC also have recreational marijuana: Illinois, Maine, and Vermont.
The DEA’s Domestic Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program seized $52,308,982 in assets related to illicit cannabis plants last year.
33 states and DC have legal medical marijuana, and 11 states and DC have legal recreational marijuana.
Read what the 2020 candidates think about recreational marijuana legalization on our 2020 election site.

PLEASE CONTINUE READING…

On Tuesday, November 5th, WE Must Be The Change In Kentucky! Vote HICKS/CORMICAN! This Is Why…

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On Tuesday, November 5th, the most important election in Kentucky in many years is about to happen!

I am not here to argue with anyone.  I am here to present the facts and my opinion as I see it.

Therefore,

First of all, you must vote to see change!  If you are eligible to Vote and are registered to do so – You must VOTE!  It is your Civic Duty.  And if you are eligible to vote but did not register, shame on you!

IF you want a change in your Government, you have to vote for the people who will CHANGE the way things are being done in           Kentucky!

You CANNOT vote for a Democrat or Republican and expect anything to change – only to get worse!  So if that is what you want, then go for it!

Otherwise, BE THE CHANGE that Kentucky must have in order to succeed!  John Hicks and Ann Cormican – Libertarian are running for the most important office in the State.  That is where we must start!  At the top!

On November 1st, Rep. Jason Nemes prefiled this years “medical marijuana bill” for Kentucky.  It will become House Bill 136 when the Session opens in January, and if it passes we will once again become Slaves to the system!  A few points on the Bill as written are:

*  Department for Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control to implement and regulate the medicinal marijuana program in Kentucky;

*  establish the Division of Medicinal Marijuana within the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control;

establish restrictions on the possession of medicinal marijuana by qualifying patients, visiting patients, and designated caregivers;

*  establish certain protections for cardholders;

*  establish professional protections for practitioners; to provide for the authorizing of practitioners by state licensing boards to issue written certifications for the use medicinal marijuana;

*  establish professional protections for attorneys;

* prohibit the possession and use of medicinal marijuana while operating a motor vehicle;

to prohibit smoking of medicinal marijuana;

* to permit an employer to restrict the possession and use of medicinal marijuana by an employee;

*  to require the department to implement and operate a registry identification card program; to establish requirements for registry identification cards; to establish registry identification card fees; to require the department to operate a provisional licensure receipt system; to establish the application requirements for a registry identification card; to establish when the department may deny an application for a registry identification card;

*  establish certain responsibilities for cardholders; to establish when a registry identification card may be revoked;

*  establish various cannabis business licensure categories; to establish tiering of cannabis business licenses; to require certain information be included in an application for a cannabis business license; to establish when the department may deny an application for a cannabis business license;

*  to establish rules for local sales, including establishing the process by which a local legislative body may prohibit the operation of cannabis businesses within its territory and the process for local ordinances and ballot initiatives;

*  establish technical requirements for cannabis businesses;

to establish limits on the THC content of medicinal marijuana that can be produced or sold in the state;

*  to establish requirements for cannabis cultivators, including cultivation square footage limits; to establish requirements for cannabis dispensaries; to establish requirements for safety compliance facilities; to establish requirements for cannabis processors; to establish procedures for the department to inspect cannabis businesses;

to exempt certain records and information from the disclosure under the Kentucky Open Records Act;

*  to establish that nothing in the bill requires government programs or private insurers to reimburse for the cost of use; to establish the medicinal marijuana trust fund; to establish the local medicinal marijuana trust fund; and to establish procedures for the distribution of local cannabis trust fund moneys;

*  create a new section of KRS Chapter 138 to establish an excise tax of 12% for cultivators and processors for selling to dispensaries; to require that 80% of the revenue from the excise taxes be deposited into the medicinal marijuana trust fund; to require that 20% of the revenue from the excise taxes be deposited into the local medicinal marijuana trust fund; amend KRS 342.815 to establish that the Employer’s Mutual Insurance Authority shall not be required to provide coverage to an employer if doing so would subject the authority to a violation of state or federal law;

Is this what you want?

The above is not all inclusive of the regulations, and they will no doubt change again when it is introduced in January.  Read the Bill!

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Please note that there are NO provisions for “smokable cannabis”, and NO mention of Children’s rights either.  There are NO provisions for growing your own plants, and this BILL in my opinion is being promoted for the Corporate/Pharmaceutical industry. 

Out of all the Bills previously submitted for “medical” or “adult use” Cannabis in Kentucky this is the worst one yet!  Do not fall for the legal lies which they are feeding you because they are preying on your fears for your Children’s needs, mostly.  The fact is, what M.D., is going to give you permission or a written statement that will give you the right to medicate your child with Cannabis?  The answer to that is virtually none, and if there was even one that WOULD do it there is no guarantee that you will be able to access that Physician!

The bill would prohibit the smoking of marijuana for medical purposes, but would allow other forms of consumption, such as edibles, oils and pills.  A 12% excise tax is proposed for cultivators and processors for selling to dispensaries.  LINK

I have consulted with several other Senior Activists in Kentucky over this issue and we all surmised basically the same opinions on the matter!  This is in NO way a repeal of prohibition of Cannabis and in no way will it ascertain our rights to this plant – medically or otherwise.  It is however, worth some $$$ to Corporate Ventures and Kentucky Government as it now stands!

In my opinion, for those parents who have seriously ill children in need of this medicine they need to consider moving to a honest medical cannabis State such as Colorado or elsewhere.  For those who are unable to do this due to financial situations we must set up a fund to enable them to do so.  I can honestly say that if it were my child that is exactly what I would do!  Not because I want to leave my home in Kentucky, but because my Childs life is more important and I would be compelled to do so, IF John Hicks and Ann Cormican are not elected. 

The “Undergreen Railroad” is one such organization.  I will look into this organization further, especially if Hicks/Cormican are not elected, because you all are going to need it!

Finally, we come to the third candidate in the governor’s race. Libertarian John Hicks. John is a Vietnam Era Army veteran, a former school teacher, and currently an IT consultant. He has a BA Degree in Political Science and History. He has never held political office, but ran previously for State Representative (District 43) in 2018. John is pro-life and believes government should stay out of personal issues.
John supports the legalization of marijuana, expanded gaming, and the development of hemp as sources of additional state revenue (better than raising taxes!). He also believes that the best way to compensate for budget shortfalls is to reduce the size of government and streamlining operations. Additionally, John Hicks supports election reform; specifically by introducing run-offs, using ranked choice voting, proportional representation, multi member districts which would end partisan gerrymandering.
   LINK

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Manages Kentucky Open Source Society

John Hicks IS qualified for the position of Governor, as he IS ONE OF US!  He will bring us liberty and fight for OUR rights as Kentucky Citizens!

We need to show the entire Country what Kentucky can do when faced with such a dire situation – It’s not just about Cannabis – It is about Liberty and  Justice for All!

Please make the right choice for our State, our Families, our Children, and our Country!

Do not condemn Our State once again!

God Bless You All

smkrider

11/3/2019

https://www.facebook.com/HicksForKentucky/

https://www.facebook.com/hicksforkygov/

https://www.facebook.com/jason.nemes.1/posts/3321913687848659

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=3321910424515652&set=a.170767459629980&type=3&theater

https://legislature.ky.gov/Legislators/Pages/Legislator-Profile.aspx?DistrictNumber=33

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/prefiled/BR366.html?fbclid=IwAR1A_cH3LEwMDixbcMN1o5u5XrRB-gFQZM4qmAaZXrIZa9aYUjEjmeA4vgE

https://www.facebook.com/johnrhicks?__tn__=%2Cd-]-h-R&eid=ARANzRCvypZKWWjzlKWQixSeBkF7a97sNZINNMIU-dY8JZZgHxFfuPbr1urQ6ro5Ui9nfNGocWfFP88Z

http://www.anotheropinionblog.com/2019/11/the-2019-kentucky-election-main-event.html?fbclid=IwAR2vzCm-4QDieeyVDP2XKDUtgvSHkcivekuOVKzOCd2JiYaFJEGca1AFr7o

https://www.wlky.com/article/kentucky-lawmaker-prefiles-bill-to-legalize-medical-marijuana/29669383?fbclid=IwAR2a8kMPicpnBgioaeKcHaEoYxiuBNGC3bzvwhGsb10DS7DoVeHIMu3wBD0#

http://www.ladybud.com/2014/01/14/the-undergreen-railroad-helping-patients-relocate-for-cannabis-access/

Amid regulatory uncertainty and global demand, China’s hemp industry is booming

Submitted by Marijuana News on Tue, 10/08/2019 – 10:38

China has a zero tolerance approach to marijuana (along with numerous other drugs), yet surprisingly it is the world’s largest producer of hemp, and also the world’s largest exporter of this increasingly lucrative plant.

While chances of medical marijuana being legalized in China are seemingly next to none, calls for a clear policy when it comes to industrial hemp and CBD products are increasing — as is the plant’s production in the country.

While cannabidiol (CBD) has become as widely proliferated as over-the-counter painkillers in the West, products using this hemp-derived compound have yet to be seen stocking store shelves in China. The plant it originates from, however, has had a far lengthier history. Ma (麻), the Chinese word for hemp, has actually been in use for thousands of years, widely enough that the classic text Book of Odes, or Shi Jing (诗经), contains many references to hemp use in the daily lives of Chinese people from the 11th to 7th century BCE.

The cultivation of hemp was made illegal in 1985, despite China having a long history with the crop. It was only in 2010, after a push by locals, that authorities again allowed it to be grown on an industrial scale in Yunnan province in southwest China.

Marijuana plants containing the psychoactive agent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are to date resoundingly illegal within China — despite what Randy from South Park might think — but plants containing quantities of CBD fall into a grayer area.

As it stands, companies are allowed to farm industrial hemp in Heilongjiang and Yunnan provinces (in China’s northeast and southwest respectively). China Daily reported early this year that talk of farmers being allowed to grow industrial hemp in Jilin province (next door to Heilongjiang), which had begun in 2017, had proven fruitful. Additional sources attest that hemp is also legally being grown in regions such as Anhui, Gansu, and Xinjiang.

Figures provided on Hanma Industrial Group Co. Ltd.’s website — one of China’s leading hemp producers — show that half a million hectares of land were used to grow hemp in Anhui province, close to Shanghai in eastern China, in 2014. Other provinces, excluding Heilongjiang and Yunnan, accounted for 0.4 million hectares. Curiously, many media outlets fail to report these facts.

This confusion as to the location of hemp farms in the country is perhaps related to the distinctions of industrial hemp. Industrial hemp is a marijuana plant (cannabis sativa L. subsp. sativa var. sativa) specifically bred to contain the least amount of THC possible, and has a wide range of applications. Industrial hemp is the most commonly farmed hemp strain, although China is home to hemp plants from 33 families and more than 90 genera, including ramie, flax, jute, kenaf, sisal hemp, and abaca.

With that being said, police have historically targeted marijuana plants grown outside of the industry complex. This year, for instance, authorities eradicated 10,000 wild plants growing alongside the Yongding river in Beijing’s Fengtai district.

The mood at the Industrial Cannabis Forum of Listed Companies in mid-August was pragmatic in the face of such continued confusion over regulations in the industry. Participants called for more clearly defined policies on the issues, while Yuan Hua, general manager of Kunming Pharmaceutical Group, said that China’s cannabis industry will need an additional two to three years’ time to establish itself. Her suggestion for companies in the meantime was “research and development,” in order to create new pharmaceuticals and products and lay the groundwork for the future of the industry.

With the recent rise in products containing CBD around the globe, Chinese hemp farmers and companies have begun to turn their attention to cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, beverages, and other products that use CBD in some form.

Tan Xin, chairman and founder of Hanma Investment Group Co. Ltd., tells us: “We did a lot of research in the early days and saw that investors like Peter Thiel and George Soros had put money into this industry. We believe this business has huge potential.”

As an example of the potential lucrative nature of this industry, consider that July to late September/early October is usually harvesting season for hemp plants in China. As more companies seek to gain a foothold in this fledgling market — and news of developments like the legalization of industrial hemp farming in Jilin province has spread — stock prices for firms such as Dezhan Health and Meiyingsen have soared this year not only during harvest time, but since the beginning of 2019, prompting international media outlets like The New York Times to sit up and take notice.

Yet in a move that perhaps put a damper on the industry, the Chinese National Anti-Drug Committee published a release in mid-March earlier this year re-clarifying the country’s stance on industrial hemp farming. The release plainly stated that CBD is not included on the list of narcotic drugs in the country, and that it is not a controlled drug. It also stated that marijuana with a THC content of 0.3% or less can be grown in certain parts of China. While this release certainly clarified parts of China’s stance on CBD, it was also vague in many areas and had a negative effect on multiple stocks on Chinese exchanges, prompting investors to sell off.

Nonetheless, people like Tan are optimistic about the future of CBD in the country, particularly in the beauty industry. “Nowadays, CBD is considered an ‘all-purpose ingredient’ [for beauty] in the Western world,” says Tan. “It not only has a therapeutic effect on skin diseases, but is also effective in terms of oil control, acne, and skin whitening.

While research and development for all types of products using CBD is technically legal, only beauty products with CBD are legal to sell in China.

“Since 2015, ‘hemp leaf extraction’ can be legally used in cosmetics,” says Tan. “And because the cosmetics industry is so huge in China, we have a good shot in this business.”

He adds however that pharmaceuticals and health products remain the company’s biggest priority at the moment.

All of this points to the crux of China’s argument for the widespread legalization of industrial hemp farming and CBD use in medicine: health.

Many tout the benefits of CBD in treating conditions like epilepsy and Alzheimer’s, as well as providing pain relief, though research on some of these claims is as of yet inconclusive. According to a report by Global Times, China holds 309 of the world’s 606 hemp-related patents, but due to legal restrictions, Chinese-made food and medicine containing CBD can only find a market outside of the country, in places like the US and the EU.

As Tan puts it, “the hemp industry is a health industry. Nothing will keep us from the pursuit of health.”

CONTINUE READING…

Authored By: Radii China


(KY) General Assembly’s 2020 session to begin Jan. 7

For Immediate Release

September 18, 2019

General Assembly’s 2020 session to begin Jan. 7

FRANKFORT – The schedule for the 2020 Regular Session of the Kentucky General Assembly was approved today by legislative leaders.

The session is scheduled to convene on Jan. 7 and adjourn April 15. It is expected to last 60 legislative days – the maximum allowed by the state constitution in even-numbered years.

Lawmakers will not convene on Jan. 20 in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day or on Feb. 17 in observance of Presidents’ Day.

March 2 will be the final day that House bills can be introduced and March 3 will be the final day for the introduction of Senate bills. Bills that have been introduced by these deadlines will be able to continue moving through the legislative process until the session adjourns.

The veto recess – the period of time in which lawmakers return to their home districts to await possible gubernatorial vetoes of legislation – will run from April 2-13. Lawmakers will return to the Capitol on April 14 and 15 for the final two days of the session.

To view the calendar online, go to: https://legislature.ky.gov/Documents/20RS_Calendar.pdf.

–END–

(KY) (HEMP) New Herbicide Approved by EPA

Kentucky Heligen 24(c) Request Approved; Can Help Control Corn Earworm, Cotton Bollworm, and Tobacco Budworm

Heligen, manufactured by AgBiTech Pty Ltd, can now be used on industrial hemp in Kentucky to aid in control of corn earworm, cotton bollworm and tobacco budworm.

This has been accomplished through a Special Local Needs (SLN) 24(c) request submitted by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) to the EPA.

Use of Heligen (EPA Registration No.: 87978-2) is approved through December 31, 2024 unless the SLN is otherwise amended, withdrawn, canceled or suspended.

Hemp producers are responsible for determining which pesticides can be used and in what manner.

KDA encourages growers to work with processors or purchasers on what will be acceptable before applying this or any product. Heligen also will be added to KDA’s online list of Pesticide Products Registered for Industrial Hemp in Kentucky.

Doris Hamilton

Industrial Hemp Program Manager

Department of Agriculture

Office of Marketing

111 Corporate Drive

Frankfort, KY 40601