KDA Draft Hemp Regulations Available for Review

KDA Comment Period Open Until April 30

Dear Friends,

As the Commissioner of Agriculture for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, I wanted to draw your attention to new, draft regulations updating Kentucky’s hemp program.

The draft regulations that will govern the administration of the hemp program were recently filed for public comment. A comprehensive document can be found here, and each separate regulation is also available on our website on the “Hemp and the Law”page.

Please know that you can email your comments to KDA directly at hemp@ky.gov until April 30, 2020.

I encourage you to take advantage of this opportunity to review the draft regulations and provide feedback.

In addition, I want to ensure you knew that the Kentucky Department of Agriculture led the effort this session to pass House Bill 236, which updated Kentucky’s hemp laws. This law included two main changes:

· Updating Kentucky’s laws to align our statues with the 2018 Farm Bill; and

· Allowing licensed hemp processors in Kentucky to transport or sell their hemp concentrate to another licensed hemp processor location in Kentucky, if that interaction is reported to and approved by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture at least 24 hours in advance.

Thank you for your interest in this new industry.

LINK TO NEW PROPOSED REGULATIONS (PDF)

Kentucky Department of Agriculture kda@kygov.ccsend.com

Medical marijuana bill advances in KY General Assembly

Above:  HB 136 primary cosponsor Rep. Jason Nemes, R-Louisville, presenting the medical marijuana legislation for a floor vote.

For Immediate Release

February 20, 2020

Medical marijuana bill advances in KY General Assembly

FRANKFORT— For the first time in Kentucky history, a bill to legalize medical marijuana came to a vote on the floor of the Kentucky House. Apparently the first time was a charm.

Members of the House voted 65-30 to approve the legalization of medical marijuana under House Bill 136, along with eight floor amendments to the bill. The measure now goes to the Senate for its consideration.

“HB 136 when it is passed, which I hope that it is, will be the tightest medical marijuana bill in the country,” said Rep. Jason Nemes, R-Louisville, who shares primary sponsorship of the measure with Rep. John Sims Jr., D-Flemingsburg.

Nemes said that he and Sims have spent years meeting with stakeholders to ensure that the legislation addresses their concerns.

“We’ve met with stakeholders from law enforcement, constituents, regular folks … patients, physicians, chiropractors. I mean, you name it, we’ve been there,” he said.

The bill as passed by the House would extensively clarify state policies for cultivation, processing, sale, distribution, and use of medical marijuana. Licensing of cannabis dispensaries is covered, as is maintenance of a cardholder registry for cannabis users.

Smoking of medical marijuana would be prohibited under HB 136.  The bill instead would allow the drug to be dispensed as “edibles” such as gummies, oils, or similar products.  Customers would be limited to a month’s supply at one time.

Keeping with the sponsors’ commitment to make HB 136 a public health bill and not a revenue maker, Nemes said excise taxes and all other revenue created by the bill would go to regulation of the program and nothing else. Additionally, local governments would have the last say in whether medical marijuana businesses operate within their jurisdiction.

Among those House members voting against the proposal was former Kentucky State Trooper and current pastor Rep. Chris Fugate, R-Chavies. He cited the fact that marijuana remains a federally controlled substance that isn’t regulated by the Food and Drug Administration as a reason for his vote.

“Marijuana, no matter how we look at it, is against federal law” and joins heroin, LSD, and ectasy as a Schedule I narcotic, said Fugate. It is also a “gateway drug,” he said, referring to drugs that are believed by some to lead to abuse of more dangerous drugs later on.

Voting is support of the bill was Rep. Robert Goforth, R-East Bernstadt. The licensed pharmacist said he supports the bill on behalf of individuals like his adult brother diagnosed years ago with cerebral palsy.

Goforth said he sees his brother suffer on a regular basis from “adverse side effects” caused by FDA-approved anticonvulsants and other drugs.

“If I can give him a little bit of relief from the FDA-approved medication that has caused those adverse side effects for him, to control those conditions, I’m going to do it. I have to do it,” he said.

END

Kentucky hits record number of registered voters

FRANKFORT, Ky. (WBKO) – Secretary of State Michael G. Adams announced Wednesday that a record number of Kentuckians are registered to vote.

Adams said a total of 3,462,152 Kentuckians were registered as of January 31.

“I encourage every eligible person who is not registered to vote to do so by April 20, the last day to register to vote in the May 19 primary,” Adams said. “We have many easy ways to register to vote, including at GoVoteKy.com.. We had relatively high voter turnout in 2019, and I hope this year as we pick a President, Senator and other important officials, Kentuckians will show up strong at the polls.”

Democratic registrants represent just more than 48 percent of the electorate with 1,678,538 registered voters. Republican registrants total 1,477,985, or almost 43 percent of voters, and almost 9 percent of voters are listed under other affiliations.

Complete registration statistics can be found on the State Board of Elections website, elect.ky.gov.

CONTINUE READING….

GO VOTE!

REMEMBER! MARK YOUR CALENDAR! MARCH 11TH, 2020; Cannabis Rally In The Rotunda–FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY.

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RotundaRally3.11.20

MARCH 11TH, 2020

12:30 PM – 2:00 PM

CAPITOL ROTUNDA

700 CAPITOL AVENUE

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY  40601

We will be discussing the progress we have made, current legislation, and what folks can do to help end the prohibition against this life-saving plant.
All advocates, and all parties, are welcomed!
If interested in speaking about your cannabis bill, or a bill you have sponsored, please PM us, or leave a comment below and we will reach out to you.
We hope to see y’all there!!
If you are a CBD store owner, cannabis farmer, cannabis processor, or you sell cannabis products in Kentucky and you plan to be at the rally, please leave a comment below so folks know to look for you.

ANY QUESTIONS?  CONTACT DAN SEUM AT THIS LINK!

KY: Sen. Perry B. Clark has introduced SB 105… “An ACT related to Cannabis”…

Image result for sen perry clark kentucky

As of today, January 22, 2020, Senator Perry Clark has introduced SB 105, “AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis and making an appropriation therefor”, as is posted on the Kentucky Legislature site. 

To date, this is the best Bill which I have seen, as it supports all facets of Cannabis, including medicinal use for those under 21 if needed. 

Here is a paragraph of the Bill:

Create various new sections of KRS Chapter 245 to define terms; to allow for possession, growth, use, processing, purchasing, transfer, and consumption of cannabis; to establish limits for transfer; to allow for purchasing and manufacture of cannabis accessories; to authorize activities and operation of retail stores, consumption establishments, cultivation facilities, cannabis testing facilities, and product manufacturing facilities; to establish possession limits; to prohibit smoking cannabis in public and to establish a fine for violation; to prohibit operation of motor vehicles while consuming cannabis and to specify that existing intoxication laws are not superseded; to prohibit state or local resources to be used to investigate violations of federal Controlled Substances Act that conflict with this KRS Chapter 245; to specify that an employer is not required to allow consumption, workplace intoxication, possession, or transfer of cannabis; to prohibit individuals under the age of 21 from entering cannabis establishments, purchasing, using, or misrepresenting their age and to provide for exceptions; to establish provisions for palliative or therapeutic use of cannabis by persons under the age of 21  LINK

The full Bill can be viewed at this link….

Please view the entire Bill!

RotundaRally3.11.20

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2019/12/19/2020-kentucky-marijuana-bills/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2020/01/16/kentucky-please-get-involved-this-session/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2020/01/16/kentucky-cannabis-rally-at-the-rotunda-in-frankfort/

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/sb105.html

https://legislature.ky.gov/Legislators/Pages/Legislator-Profile.aspx?DistrictNumber=137

In a related article from 2013…

https://louisvillefuture.com/archived-news/perry-clark-pushes-for-pot-says-the-people-must-push/

Big Hemp News in Kentucky…With National Impact

Both historically, and more recently as prohibition has been lifted, Kentucky has played an outsized role in the development of the nation’s hemp industry.  From 19th century hemp farmer/US House Speaker Henry Clay to today’s political leaders, such as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and U.S. Reps. James Comer and Thomas Massie, Kentuckians have served as national leaders in legalizing, cultivating and commercializing the crop.

Today, a significant step was taken by Kentucky’s Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles:  Quarles announced this morning that Kentucky would NOT be submitting a hemp plan for USDA approval under the agency’s Interim Final Rule (IFR), but rather would continue to operate its program under the 2014 Farm Bill authorization.  Just as with the concerns we shared here (and in our private meetings with USDA leadership), Quarles recognized that many outstanding issues remain regarding the IFR, and that these issues that are not likely to be resolved before planting season begins.  Instead, the Department will share its recommendations with the USDA as it develops a final rule, hopefully in time for the 2021 growing season.

We imagine that other states will follow Kentucky’s lead and operate under the 2014 Farm Bill authorization as the USDA listens to stakeholders and the public as it designs its Final Rule.  This would make a strong statement that the IFR needs a substantial overhaul, and given the laudable public outreach conducted by the USDA, we are confident that the agency will listen and respond.

Hemp Supporters, that’s your cue…
If you haven’t yet submitted comments to the USDA about its Interim Final Rule, the deadline is next week, January 29.  You can submit your comments here.  And please feel free to echo any of the comments the Roundtable made, which are available here

SOURCE:  U.S. Hemp Roundtable <info@hempsupporter.com>

KENTUCKY CANNABIS RALLY AT THE ROTUNDA IN FRANKFORT!

The people of Kentucky, all groups, all BILLS for Cannabis whether it be “Medical” or “Adult Use”, Republican, Democrat, Libertarian or Independent, are requested to join us in Frankfort Kentucky on March 11, 2020 to show our support for the effort in our State!

Please plan to be there!

RotundaRally3.11.20

LOCATED AT CAPITOL ROTUNDA

700 CAPITOL AVE

FRANKFORT, KY  40601

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/19rs/hb136.html

AN ACT relating to medicinal marijuana and making an appropriation therefor.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb148.html

AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb236.html

AN ACT relating to hemp and declaring an emergency.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb221.html

AN ACT relating to marijuana possession.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb102.html

AN ACT relating to employment-related drug screens.

RELATED GROUPS/PAGES ON FACEBOOK!

MY RIGHT TO DECIDE

https://www.facebook.com/MYRIGHTTODECIDE/

KY4MM

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ky4mm/?ref=br_rs

KENTUCKY 411 UNCENSORED

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2091597957797912/

KENTUCKY MARIJUANA PARTY

https://www.facebook.com/USMjPartyKY/?ref=br_rs

FREE THE WEED KENTUCKY

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1428715180676475/?ref=br_rs

1937 Marihuana Tax Act – First Convictions — In A Nutshell

I received the following thru email from “Uncle Mike”… Thought it was well worth passing on….  No “cannabis” law is a good “cannabis” law!

caldwell

1937 Marihuana Tax Act – First Convictions — In A Nutshell

Uncle Mike 10/29/2019

Historically significant fact check list addressing common issues & problems with dates, people, places, charges and the chain of events surrounding America’s first federal marijuana convictions. This short 1-page report is based on the larger 190-page criminal case study book entitled:

U. S. District Court, Denver, Colorado Imposes First Federal Marihuana Law Penalties, Compilation of Publications, Interviews, Criminal Files and Photographs of Moses Baca & Samuel Caldwell, By Uncle Mike, Copyright Nov 12 2008, Feb 17 2010, May 5 2019.

The Marihuana Tax Act was approved August 2, 1937 and went into effect Friday, October 1st 1937.

Moses Baca, age 23, Mexican American born in Trinidad Colorado, was charged with violating the act on Monday the 4th.

Samuel R. Caldwell, age 57, white guy from Indiana, was charged with violating the act on Tuesday the 5th.

Federal grand jury indictments were issued on Thursday, October 7th, and both men were then brought before the court and sentenced on Friday, October 8th, 1937 after pleading guilty.

Leading the first federal court proceedings was Moses Baca, who received an 18-month sentence in Leavenworth Penitentiary for possessing ¼ ounce of marihuana. A search of his home was conducted at 2625 California Street, after a drunk & disturbance arrest, revealing one-fourth ounce of marijuana in his bureau drawer.

Following Baca’s possession case, Samuel R. Caldwell was sentenced. He received 4 years in the Leavenworth Penitentiary for selling 3 marihuana cigarettes to a man he met on the street named Claude Morgan and possessing 4 pounds of marihuana later found hidden in his Lothrop Hotel room at 1755 Lawrence. According to Caldwell’s friend, Alex Rahoutis, he had only been dealing a few months when he was busted by federal agents, and apparently didn’t smoke weed himself.

After their release:

Moses Baca, after his release on Dec 10, 1938, he returned to Denver, Colorado, but in 1940 he moved with his family to California. Moses ended up in Los Angeles General Hospital and died on March 19, 1948 of a ruptured pulmonary tuberculosis abscess that caused blood poisoning. The disease was most likely contracted in Denver as TB suffers commonly came to Colorado thinking the states dry air would help cure them.

Samuel Caldwell, after serving his sentence, was released on Nov. 5th, 1940. Approximately 8

months after his release Caldwell died in Denver, Colorado on June 24, 1941 of Primary Carcinoma of the Liver from excessive drinking.

Thank you for contacting me with your thoughts on marijuana

I received the following letter from Sen. Mitch McConnell on the 10th of this month.  Thought I would share it. 

legalize-marijuana-leaf-red-white-blue-flag-300x300

Dear Ms. Krider;

Thank you for contacting me with your thoughts on marijuana.  Your views help me represent Kentucky and the nation in the United States Senate, and I appreciate the opportunity to respond to your concerns. 

Kentuckians continue to combat the negative consequences associated with the cultivation and distribution of marijuana in communities across the state.  According to the Drug Enforcement Agency, in 2018, approximately 418,076 plants were eradicated in the Commonwealth, over $471,000 worth of assets were seized, and more than 73 weapons were taken off the streets as a result of the marijuana eradication operations.  Traffickers have been known to trespass on both private and public lands, often resulting in damage to private property and many of the Commonwealth’s most cherished natural habitats. 

There is no doubt that drug abuse persists as a serious problem in all 120 counties of the Commonwealth, and the effects of such abuse have proved devastating for our local communities.  That is one reason why I welcomed Jim Carroll, Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, to visit Kentucky in March, 2019.  Known as the country’s “drug czar,” Director Carroll focused his attention on understanding Kentucky’s efforts to treat addiction and combat drug abuse and trafficking.

In your correspondence, you mentioned the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act of 2019 (S. 2227).  Introduced by Senator Kamala Harris on July 23, 2019, the MORE Act would remove marijuana from the schedule of controlled substances, create a grant program for areas impacted by marijuana convictions, and provide for expungement for certain cannabis offenses.  Because of the harm that substances like marijuana and other illegal drugs pose to our society, I oppose their legalization.  That said, I will keep your thoughts in mind as the 116th Congress proceeds. 

Thank you for contacting me about this important matter.  If you would like to receive periodic updates about issues such as this, please sign up for my eNewsletter at http://mcconnell.senate.gov/ and become a fan of my page on Facebook, by visiting http://www.facebook.com/mitchmcconnell or follow my office on Twitter @McConnellPress.

Sincerely,

MITCH McCONNELL
UNITED STATES SENATOR