REMEMBER! MARK YOUR CALENDAR! MARCH 11TH, 2020; Cannabis Rally In The Rotunda–FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY.

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MARCH 11TH, 2020

12:30 PM – 2:00 PM

CAPITOL ROTUNDA

700 CAPITOL AVENUE

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY  40601

We will be discussing the progress we have made, current legislation, and what folks can do to help end the prohibition against this life-saving plant.
All advocates, and all parties, are welcomed!
If interested in speaking about your cannabis bill, or a bill you have sponsored, please PM us, or leave a comment below and we will reach out to you.
We hope to see y’all there!!
If you are a CBD store owner, cannabis farmer, cannabis processor, or you sell cannabis products in Kentucky and you plan to be at the rally, please leave a comment below so folks know to look for you.

ANY QUESTIONS?  CONTACT DAN SEUM AT THIS LINK!

KY: Sen. Perry B. Clark has introduced SB 105… “An ACT related to Cannabis”…

Image result for sen perry clark kentucky

As of today, January 22, 2020, Senator Perry Clark has introduced SB 105, “AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis and making an appropriation therefor”, as is posted on the Kentucky Legislature site. 

To date, this is the best Bill which I have seen, as it supports all facets of Cannabis, including medicinal use for those under 21 if needed. 

Here is a paragraph of the Bill:

Create various new sections of KRS Chapter 245 to define terms; to allow for possession, growth, use, processing, purchasing, transfer, and consumption of cannabis; to establish limits for transfer; to allow for purchasing and manufacture of cannabis accessories; to authorize activities and operation of retail stores, consumption establishments, cultivation facilities, cannabis testing facilities, and product manufacturing facilities; to establish possession limits; to prohibit smoking cannabis in public and to establish a fine for violation; to prohibit operation of motor vehicles while consuming cannabis and to specify that existing intoxication laws are not superseded; to prohibit state or local resources to be used to investigate violations of federal Controlled Substances Act that conflict with this KRS Chapter 245; to specify that an employer is not required to allow consumption, workplace intoxication, possession, or transfer of cannabis; to prohibit individuals under the age of 21 from entering cannabis establishments, purchasing, using, or misrepresenting their age and to provide for exceptions; to establish provisions for palliative or therapeutic use of cannabis by persons under the age of 21  LINK

The full Bill can be viewed at this link….

Please view the entire Bill!

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https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2019/12/19/2020-kentucky-marijuana-bills/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2020/01/16/kentucky-please-get-involved-this-session/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2020/01/16/kentucky-cannabis-rally-at-the-rotunda-in-frankfort/

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/sb105.html

https://legislature.ky.gov/Legislators/Pages/Legislator-Profile.aspx?DistrictNumber=137

In a related article from 2013…

https://louisvillefuture.com/archived-news/perry-clark-pushes-for-pot-says-the-people-must-push/

Big Hemp News in Kentucky…With National Impact

Both historically, and more recently as prohibition has been lifted, Kentucky has played an outsized role in the development of the nation’s hemp industry.  From 19th century hemp farmer/US House Speaker Henry Clay to today’s political leaders, such as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and U.S. Reps. James Comer and Thomas Massie, Kentuckians have served as national leaders in legalizing, cultivating and commercializing the crop.

Today, a significant step was taken by Kentucky’s Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles:  Quarles announced this morning that Kentucky would NOT be submitting a hemp plan for USDA approval under the agency’s Interim Final Rule (IFR), but rather would continue to operate its program under the 2014 Farm Bill authorization.  Just as with the concerns we shared here (and in our private meetings with USDA leadership), Quarles recognized that many outstanding issues remain regarding the IFR, and that these issues that are not likely to be resolved before planting season begins.  Instead, the Department will share its recommendations with the USDA as it develops a final rule, hopefully in time for the 2021 growing season.

We imagine that other states will follow Kentucky’s lead and operate under the 2014 Farm Bill authorization as the USDA listens to stakeholders and the public as it designs its Final Rule.  This would make a strong statement that the IFR needs a substantial overhaul, and given the laudable public outreach conducted by the USDA, we are confident that the agency will listen and respond.

Hemp Supporters, that’s your cue…
If you haven’t yet submitted comments to the USDA about its Interim Final Rule, the deadline is next week, January 29.  You can submit your comments here.  And please feel free to echo any of the comments the Roundtable made, which are available here

SOURCE:  U.S. Hemp Roundtable <info@hempsupporter.com>

KENTUCKY CANNABIS RALLY AT THE ROTUNDA IN FRANKFORT!

The people of Kentucky, all groups, all BILLS for Cannabis whether it be “Medical” or “Adult Use”, Republican, Democrat, Libertarian or Independent, are requested to join us in Frankfort Kentucky on March 11, 2020 to show our support for the effort in our State!

Please plan to be there!

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LOCATED AT CAPITOL ROTUNDA

700 CAPITOL AVE

FRANKFORT, KY  40601

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/19rs/hb136.html

AN ACT relating to medicinal marijuana and making an appropriation therefor.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb148.html

AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb236.html

AN ACT relating to hemp and declaring an emergency.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb221.html

AN ACT relating to marijuana possession.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb102.html

AN ACT relating to employment-related drug screens.

RELATED GROUPS/PAGES ON FACEBOOK!

MY RIGHT TO DECIDE

https://www.facebook.com/MYRIGHTTODECIDE/

KY4MM

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ky4mm/?ref=br_rs

KENTUCKY 411 UNCENSORED

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2091597957797912/

KENTUCKY MARIJUANA PARTY

https://www.facebook.com/USMjPartyKY/?ref=br_rs

FREE THE WEED KENTUCKY

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1428715180676475/?ref=br_rs

1937 Marihuana Tax Act – First Convictions — In A Nutshell

I received the following thru email from “Uncle Mike”… Thought it was well worth passing on….  No “cannabis” law is a good “cannabis” law!

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1937 Marihuana Tax Act – First Convictions — In A Nutshell

Uncle Mike 10/29/2019

Historically significant fact check list addressing common issues & problems with dates, people, places, charges and the chain of events surrounding America’s first federal marijuana convictions. This short 1-page report is based on the larger 190-page criminal case study book entitled:

U. S. District Court, Denver, Colorado Imposes First Federal Marihuana Law Penalties, Compilation of Publications, Interviews, Criminal Files and Photographs of Moses Baca & Samuel Caldwell, By Uncle Mike, Copyright Nov 12 2008, Feb 17 2010, May 5 2019.

The Marihuana Tax Act was approved August 2, 1937 and went into effect Friday, October 1st 1937.

Moses Baca, age 23, Mexican American born in Trinidad Colorado, was charged with violating the act on Monday the 4th.

Samuel R. Caldwell, age 57, white guy from Indiana, was charged with violating the act on Tuesday the 5th.

Federal grand jury indictments were issued on Thursday, October 7th, and both men were then brought before the court and sentenced on Friday, October 8th, 1937 after pleading guilty.

Leading the first federal court proceedings was Moses Baca, who received an 18-month sentence in Leavenworth Penitentiary for possessing ¼ ounce of marihuana. A search of his home was conducted at 2625 California Street, after a drunk & disturbance arrest, revealing one-fourth ounce of marijuana in his bureau drawer.

Following Baca’s possession case, Samuel R. Caldwell was sentenced. He received 4 years in the Leavenworth Penitentiary for selling 3 marihuana cigarettes to a man he met on the street named Claude Morgan and possessing 4 pounds of marihuana later found hidden in his Lothrop Hotel room at 1755 Lawrence. According to Caldwell’s friend, Alex Rahoutis, he had only been dealing a few months when he was busted by federal agents, and apparently didn’t smoke weed himself.

After their release:

Moses Baca, after his release on Dec 10, 1938, he returned to Denver, Colorado, but in 1940 he moved with his family to California. Moses ended up in Los Angeles General Hospital and died on March 19, 1948 of a ruptured pulmonary tuberculosis abscess that caused blood poisoning. The disease was most likely contracted in Denver as TB suffers commonly came to Colorado thinking the states dry air would help cure them.

Samuel Caldwell, after serving his sentence, was released on Nov. 5th, 1940. Approximately 8

months after his release Caldwell died in Denver, Colorado on June 24, 1941 of Primary Carcinoma of the Liver from excessive drinking.

Thank you for contacting me with your thoughts on marijuana

I received the following letter from Sen. Mitch McConnell on the 10th of this month.  Thought I would share it. 

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Dear Ms. Krider;

Thank you for contacting me with your thoughts on marijuana.  Your views help me represent Kentucky and the nation in the United States Senate, and I appreciate the opportunity to respond to your concerns. 

Kentuckians continue to combat the negative consequences associated with the cultivation and distribution of marijuana in communities across the state.  According to the Drug Enforcement Agency, in 2018, approximately 418,076 plants were eradicated in the Commonwealth, over $471,000 worth of assets were seized, and more than 73 weapons were taken off the streets as a result of the marijuana eradication operations.  Traffickers have been known to trespass on both private and public lands, often resulting in damage to private property and many of the Commonwealth’s most cherished natural habitats. 

There is no doubt that drug abuse persists as a serious problem in all 120 counties of the Commonwealth, and the effects of such abuse have proved devastating for our local communities.  That is one reason why I welcomed Jim Carroll, Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, to visit Kentucky in March, 2019.  Known as the country’s “drug czar,” Director Carroll focused his attention on understanding Kentucky’s efforts to treat addiction and combat drug abuse and trafficking.

In your correspondence, you mentioned the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act of 2019 (S. 2227).  Introduced by Senator Kamala Harris on July 23, 2019, the MORE Act would remove marijuana from the schedule of controlled substances, create a grant program for areas impacted by marijuana convictions, and provide for expungement for certain cannabis offenses.  Because of the harm that substances like marijuana and other illegal drugs pose to our society, I oppose their legalization.  That said, I will keep your thoughts in mind as the 116th Congress proceeds. 

Thank you for contacting me about this important matter.  If you would like to receive periodic updates about issues such as this, please sign up for my eNewsletter at http://mcconnell.senate.gov/ and become a fan of my page on Facebook, by visiting http://www.facebook.com/mitchmcconnell or follow my office on Twitter @McConnellPress.

Sincerely,

MITCH McCONNELL
UNITED STATES SENATOR

Agencies clarify requirements for providing financial services to hemp-related businesses

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From Board of Governors Federal Reserve System

Agencies clarify requirements for providing financial services to hemp-related businesses

December 3, 2019 

WASHINGTON-Four federal agencies in conjunction with the state bank regulators today issued a statement clarifying the legal status of hemp growth and production and the relevant requirements under the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) for banks providing services to hemp-related businesses.

The statement emphasizes that banks are no longer required to file suspicious activity reports (SAR) for customers solely because they are engaged in the growth or cultivation of hemp in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. For hemp-related customers, banks are expected to follow standard SAR procedures, and file a SAR if indicia of suspicious activity warrants.

This statement provides banks with background information on the legal status of hemp, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) interim final rule on the production of hemp, and the BSA considerations when providing banking services to hemp-related businesses.

This statement also indicates that the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) will issue additional guidance after further reviewing and evaluating the USDA interim final rule.

The statement was issued by the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, FinCEN, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Conference of State Bank Supervisors. Banks can contact the USDA, state departments of agriculture, and tribal governments with further questions regarding the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (2018 Farm Bill) and its implementing regulations.

Joint Guidance on Providing Financial Services to Customers Engaged in Hemp-Related Businesses (PDF)

For Federal Reserve Board media inquiries please contact Darren Gersh at 202-452-2955.

Source Link

(KY) Hemp, broadband concerns brought before state panel

For Immediate Release

November 18, 2019

Hemp, broadband concerns brought before state panel

FRANKFORT—Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mark Haney said his organization’s advice for Kentucky’s growing number of hemp producers is “be careful.”

Haney told the Interim Joint Committee on Agriculture today that farmers are encouraged to enter the growing hemp industry, but with minimal risk. Kentucky is still in its first five years of modern hemp production which began in 2014 under the state’s Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program.

The research pilot program is ending this year, with the state’s Hemp Licensing Program entering a new stage of commercial production in 2020.

“We tell all the producers, and have been saying all along, be careful. Go slow. Don’t risk any more than you can afford to put at risk,” said Haney. The caution comes as many farmers, he said, look to hemp as a replacement for once-reliable sources of income—like tobacco—amid today’s agriculture market disruptions and downturns.

Making hemp as profitable as tobacco once was to Kentucky farmers, if possible, will take time, said Haney.

“It would be wonderful if we could do that,” he said. “So we’re telling folks, ‘help us build the industry and don’t just try to swing for a home run.’”

Haney said the Farm Bureau has formed a hemp advisory committee to work on issues that could help farmers build the industry moving forward. That work, he said, could come in handy in any future legislative discussions concerning the farmer’s role in the hemp industry. Haney said he hopes hemp processors will take a similar approach regarding their role in the industry.

“Most of the questions about hemp that I’ve heard were not about production of hemp. It was about the processing of hemp and how we transport it, how we get paid for it, (about) the systems from the farm gate through the rest of the pipeline,” said Haney.

Rep. Joe Graviss, D-Versailles, asked Haney if the Farm Bureau’s hemp advisory committee could look into whether Kentucky farmers are being fairly compensated for their crop. He also encouraged a standard means to test hemp products, saying he would like the organization to look into “standardization in testing” of hemp products on store shelves to make sure “what is on the shelf at a gas station or a pharmacy is actually going to contain the same stuff.”

Concerns about cash flow to hemp producers also voiced by Graviss were shared earlier in the meeting with Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy Executive Director Warren Beeler, who said farmers have had high hopes for hemp amid uncertainty in other agricultural markets. Now farmers are finding that hemp production brings its own uncertainty, he told lawmakers.

“We don’t know exactly where we’re going to end up,” said Beeler. “But hemp has a chance to help us. It has a chance to be maybe that tobacco that we thought we’d never have a replacement for.”

One of the most critical issues facing many Kentucky farmers, said Haney, is the need for high-speed broadband. While most Kentuckians have internet access, Haney said rural areas remain that don’t have the connection speed necessary to use high-tech apps and programs now commonplace in modern agriculture.

“If you can’t operate the device that you’re working with because the speed is so low that you can’t even download the programming … it’s pretty sad. And it’s important to our members more now than it has ever been before,” said Haney, adding that his organization will likely approach the Kentucky General Assembly for help on the matter in the future.

Sen. Stephen West, R-Paris, an attorney and cattle farmer, said internet connectivity is important to him and his constituents, including a number of rural Kentuckians with limited internet access. West said that while full implementation the KentuckyWired project—which is intended to provide gigabit-speed access statewide—is expected within the next year or so, he wonders what support there is from the private sector for improved internet speed.

“They have to address these issues to get more service out to our farmers and rural areas,” West said.

Haney said the Farm Bureau is communicating with the private sector and is “hoping to put together some stakeholders that will continue to work on this in the near future.”

END



https://kentuckywired.ky.gov/Pages/index.aspx

DEA Data Show Kentucky Has Highest Rate of Illicit Marijuana Plants in US

Monday, Nov. 11, 2019 | Author: ProCon.org

Kentucky, where both recreational and medical marijuana are illegal, grows more illicit marijuana plants per 100,000 people than any other state, according to DEA data analyzed by American Addiction Centers. In 2018, the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) eradicated 418,076 cannabis plants in Kentucky, about 9,356 plants per 100,000 people.
California, which legalized medical marijuana in 1996 and recreational marijuana in 2016, came in second place with 4,572 illegal cannabis plants per 100,000 people. The DEA confiscated over 1.8 million marijuana plants in the state last year.
Massachusetts and Wyoming tied for last place with zero cultivated plants seized by the DEA in 2018. Wyoming has not legalized marijuana, but Massachusetts legalized medical marijuana in 2012 and adult-use (also called recreational) cannabis in 2016.
Across the United States, the DEA seized 2.82 million cannabis plants in 2018, down from 3.38 million plants in 2017.
Kentucky also earned first place in the number of destroyed illegal grow sites in the country. 15 grow sites per 100,000 people were destroyed in Kentucky, more than double the next-highest state, West Virginia (7.4 per 100,000 people). West Virginia legalized medical marijuana in 2017 but has not legalized recreational use.
Delaware, DC, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming all had zero grow sites destroyed per 100,000 people. Except Wyoming, each of those states and DC have legalized medical marijuana, and 3 states and DC have legalized recreational use: Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont.
Despite not having any plants seized, Wyoming bulk-processed the most marijuana at 1,095 pounds per 100,000 people, 46.8% more than the next highest state, Arizona, which had 746 pounds per 100,000 people. Arizona legalized medical marijuana in 2010. American Addiction Centers theorized that the marijuana being bulk-processed in Wyoming might come from nearby states that have legalized marijuana, such as Colorado.
Delaware, DC, Illinois, Maine, Minnesota, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Vermont bulk-process the least amount of marijuana (0 pounds per 100,000 people). Among those states, only South Dakota and Tennessee have not legalized marijuana for medical use. Three of those states and DC also have recreational marijuana: Illinois, Maine, and Vermont.
The DEA’s Domestic Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program seized $52,308,982 in assets related to illicit cannabis plants last year.
33 states and DC have legal medical marijuana, and 11 states and DC have legal recreational marijuana.
Read what the 2020 candidates think about recreational marijuana legalization on our 2020 election site.

PLEASE CONTINUE READING…